Firearm Offenses

United States v. Jack Voris (9th Cir. July 2020)

The Ninth Circuit reversed one of the defendant's assault convictions and corresponding § 924(c) convictions as multiplicitous because the defendant, although charged with shooting at five officers, only shot at them four times. The Court also held that multiple shots fired in quick succession do not necessarily mean the firearm was only used once under 924(c).

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United States v. Robert Triggs (7th Cir. July 2020)

The Seventh Circuit reversed the defendant's conviction under 922(g) based on his prior misdemeanor conviction for family violence battery. Under Rehaif, the Government would have had to prove that the defendant knew that his prior conviction prohibited him from possessing firearms, and the defendant established a reasonable probability that he would not have pleaded guilty had he known the Government's burden, especially given the circumstances of his prior misdemeanor conviction, which involved a guilty plea without counsel or being thoroughly advised of the collateral consequences.

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United States v. Darius Caldwell (11th Cir. June 2020)

The Court affirmed the defendant's conviction for armed bank robbery and related firearm charges, holding that the a trial court's admission of unduly suggestive out-of-court identifications is not reversible error where the identification is otherwise reliable, there was sufficient evidence that the bank was federally insured, and new DNA testimony regarding deviations between the witness's testimony and the FBI's guidelines on DNA evidence would not likely change the outcome of the trial.

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United States v. Surmondrea McGregor (11th Cir. June 2020)

The Court affirmed the defendant's convictions for unlawful possession of unauthorized access devices and aggravated identity fraud, holding that it was not an abuse of discretion for the court to admit evidence of a firearm owned by the defendant. The evidence was relevant to the defendant's possession of the unauthorized access devices because the firearm was found within close proximity of the access devices and within the same small area, and the probative value outweighed any undue prejudice, especially since the government did not indicate to the jury that the firearm was unlawfully owned.

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