Second Circuit

United States v. Juan Solano (2nd Cir. July 2020)

The Second Circuit reversed a defendant's conviction. The defendant testified at trial, and the district court plainly erred in instructing the jury that any witness with an interest in the outcome of the case may have a motive to testify falsely, as it cut against the presumption of innocence and prejudiced the defendant.

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United States v. Brandon Jones (2nd Cir. July 2020)

The Second Circuit upheld a conviction for using fictitious government documents because 18 U.S.C. § 514 applies to both fake versions of existing documents and wholly contrived, fake documents. The Court held that evidence that a defendant used inauthentic documents, misrepresented government employment, and paid with fake purchase orders is sufficient to uphold a conviction.

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United States v. Jaquan Walker (2nd Cir. July 2020)

The Second Circuit held that a defendant’s stop was unconstitutional where it was based on the officer receiving an email with a photograph of a suspect who only shared general characteristics with the defendant and the photo did not involve any criminal activity. The Court also held that the attenuation doctrine did not apply because the officers' misconduct was purposeful or flagrant due to the extreme lack of reasonable suspicion.

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United States v. Colinford Mattis, Urooj Rahman (2d Cir. June 2020)

In a case involving young lawyers charged with throwing molotov cocktails into an unoccupied police cruiser, the Second Circuit affirmed the district court's order releasing them on bond pending trial. The Court concluded that the district court did not clearly err in determining the conditions of release were adequate to safeguard the community and that it did not err by not explicitly mentioning the statutory presumption against release in its order.

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United States v. Albi Doka (2d Cir. April 2020)

Upon the defendant's appeal of his revocation of supervised release, the Second Circuit held that the Supreme Court's decision in United States v. Haymond did not overrule its prior precedent that district courts may engage in fact-finding when revoking a defendant's supervised release and imposing an additional term of imprisonment under 18 U.S.C. § 3583(e)(3).

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