United States v. Herman Adair (7th Cir. June 2019)

The Court upheld a stop and frisk where, despite evidence that the defendant was not wearing a hoodie and the alleged suspect was reported as wearing a hoodie, the defendant acted nervously around the officer, the officer already knew the defendant was a convicted felon, and there was a "bulge" in the defendant's pocket.

United States v. Demontae Bell (7th Cir. June 2019)

The Court held that the officer violated the defendant's Fourth Amendment right by opening his phone after the defendant's arrest, where the officer saw a picture of a firearm, but affirmed the district court's denial of the motion to suppress under the independent source doctrine, since the officers had already seen the picture on another occasion, and since there was probable cause notwithstanding the tainted picture.

United States v. William Block (7th Cir. June 2019)

The Court held that the district court lacked jurisdiction to revoke the defendant's supervised release since the defendant was not served with a formal revocation notice until after he had served the rest of his term of supervised release in custody while awaiting the revocation proceeding. The Court also rejected the Government’s argument that the defendant’s supervised release term was tolled once he was detained with two months left in the term.

United States v. Jacob Lickers (7th Cir. June 2019)

The Court affirmed the district court's denial of the defendant's motion to suppress based on a federal search warrant that was based on a defective state warrant. Though the Court agreed with the defendant that “any probable cause deficiency with the state search warrant would, as a matter of law and logic on these facts, heavily inform any conclusion we reach about the sufficiency of probable cause in the federal warrant application,” the Court upheld denial of the motion to suppress since the federal agents acted in good faith when they relied on the state warrant. The Court held that the focus should have been on the federal agents, who had no reason to question the integrity of the state proceedings, though the Court acknowledged that the result may have been different if the record reflected that the FBI had more knowledge about the state court proceedings
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